Illinois REALTOR® Magazine | April 2014

New resources help

clients learn about

property taxes

RVOICE works to inform public, policy makers about best business practices

 

Mike Scobey  |  Assistant Director, Advocacy and Local Issues

As part of IAR’s mission to help you be an information resource for your clients, the RVOICE Program has created a video and brochure on property taxes, a topic that confuses a lot of people in Illinois. The video discusses property tax basics and also explains how homeowners can attempt to appeal their taxes. Check out the video, “What You Should Know About Property Taxes” at www.illinoisrealtor.org/propertytax. The companion brochure can also be found on the webpage. Share this video and brochure with clients and prospects.

Initiatives at the local level

RVOICE has been working with the National Association of REALTORS®’ My REALTOR® Party program to make sure REALTORS® across Illinois are a resource for policy makers at the local level. By tapping into funds available from My REALTOR® Party, REALTORS® can speak with one voice about the stability that a sound and dynamic real estate market brings to our communities. In the last year, grant dollars have been used for the following projects:

  • A property tax appeals seminar was held for non-residential property owners in Cook County.
  • A seminar in Will County explained to county board members and REALTORS® the key provisions of a zoning code re-write.
  • REALTORS® in Springfield partnered with the city and the local chamber of commerce to produce a Housing Market Analysis for downtown Springfield.
  • Employer Assisted Housing Programs were coordinated with the cities of Elgin and Aurora, explaining how REALTORS® can educate local businesses on the advantages of having these programs.
  • A Housing Fair held for veterans in Belleville was attended by 120 people.

If you have an idea of a program that you think should be conducted in your community, contact your local Government Affairs Director or local Association. There are three types of funding available: housing, diversity and smart growth.

IAR also used funds on direct advocacy for local issues. Proposals requiring fire sprinkler installation in the Quad Cities were shelved as a result of an advocacy campaign. When an onerous set of rules for private septic system maintenance surfaced in Peoria County, IAR used RVOICE funds to do targeted property owner outreach. This effort resulted in the creation and adoption a more reasonable set of regulations. 

Breakout Text: 

April 2014

 


 

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